Hey, hi. I’m Jonathan McNicol.

I make radio shows.

The Nose Is Prepared to Sit Comfortably in Its Seats for One Hour and No Longer
I swear we almost never pick the Nose panelists based on the topics we plan to discuss. (We barely ever even plan in the first place, to be honest.) I asked Mr. Dankosky — former Vice President of News for WNPR, current Executive Editor of the New England News Collaborative — weeks ago to make his Nose debut this Friday…

A Look at Weiner, The Lobster, and Probably Some Other Movies with Odd Titles Too
America’s Greatest Living Film Critic David Edelstein has called “Weiner,” the new documentary about former Congressman Anthony Weiner’s ill-fated 2013 run for mayor of New York City, “one of the most provocative [docs] of its kind” that he’s seen…

The Nose on O. J.: Made in America
New York magazine’s Will Leitch has called ESPN’s new documentary O. J.: Made in America a masterpiece, and he thinks it’ll be “the only thing this country’s going to be talking about” as it airs next week. The Nose has already seen it, and it’s all we’re going to be talking about this week…

The New Haven Nose’s Tattoo Says Wall-to-Wall Fun
Paul Simon’s 13th solo studio album, Stranger to Stranger, is out today. It has apparently been gestating for going on four years, and it’s full of Harry Partch’s microtonal instruments like cloud chamber bowls and the chromelodeon. Dean Drummond’s zoomoozophome even makes an appearance. At the same time, the album is pretty rockin’ and fun…

It’s a Magazine of Sports, of Sorts: Baseball, Basketball, Scrabble, and the Spelling Bee
Ron Darling won a World Series. He was a Major League All-Star and a Gold Glove winner. He pitched a record-setting eleven hitless innings in an NCAA playoff game at Yale Field. He threw 2,742 and one-third professional innings over 15 professional seasons, winning 157 professional games. And so for his new book, he’s chosen to focus on a specific three and two-thirds innings where he happened not to pitch very well.…

Live (on Tape) from the Peabody!
In the more than six years that it’s been on the air, we’ve never taken The Colin McEnroe Show to the Peabody Museum before. (Crazy, right?) And: In the more than six years that it’ s been on the air, we’ve never done a Colin McEnroe Show about dinosaurs before. (Crazy! Right!?)

The Scramble Scrambles the Steves Metcalf
Rather than me ham-handedly trying to summarize Stephen Metcalf’s Slate cover story, “Donald Trump, Baby Boomer,” here’s his thesis…

The Nose Is a Low-Flying Panic Attack
This hour, the Nose does its best to tackle four full topics…

The Nose Better Call Becky With the Good Hair
We plan to spend upwards of half of this hour unpacking Beyonce’s new visual album, Lemonade. And we will barely have gotten the wrapper off by the time we’re done…

2day Is the First Day of the Rest of The Nose’s Life
His Royal Badness died yesterday. He was 57. This hour, an appreciation of Prince…

Good Bulldozer, Bad Bulldozer
Everybody loves a bulldozer. In fact, we all grew up loving bulldozers, didn’t we? From Benny the Bulldozer to Katy and her big snow, from all the Tonka toys to all the die cast model Caterpillars, the bulldozer is more of an icon in American popular culture than we maybe realize…

It's Our Secular(ish) Isms Bake Off!
It’s Yale and New Haven Humanism Week in New Haven, and so we thought: Hey, wait. Just what the heck is a humanism exactly anyway? And so then we thought: And what about, uh, agnosticism? Unitarianism? Universalism? Unitarian Universalism? Maybe even atheism?

The Nose Is Sad for Sad Ben Affleck
I get that it’s stupid April Fools’ Day, and so you can’t trust anything you see on the stupid Internet. Except for the Trump quotes. The Trump quotes are just as legitimate today as they are on all the other days. But so let me just make it clear right now that I’m totally serious when I say that on this edition of The Nose we talk about…

The Nose Brings Its Kids to Work
Chicago White Sox first baseman Adam LaRoche abruptly retired from baseball last week with a year and $13 million left on his contract because the team’s front office told him he had to stop bringing his 14-year-old son Drake into the clubhouse so much. Then the actual team rallied behind both LaRoches. But it turns out it all happened ’cause Adam’s teammates complained about Drake. But so anyway: Aren’t people who bring their kids to work with them just the worst?

A (Somewhat) Serious Look at Donald Trump’s (Possible) Presidency
For a normal show, on a normal day, in a normal time, we’d usually put two or three experts in a room with Colin and ask them to hash out whatever it is we’re interested in for that hour. For this show, by the time it’s over with, we’ll have corresponded with dozens of people and recorded interviews with seven or eight experts from ten or eleven different disciplines: a philosopher, an ethicist, a futurist, a speechwriter, a comedy writer, an author of speculative fiction, a politician, an ‘investigative humorist,’ a Muslim, an expert in international affairs, and an expert in… manners…

Our Seventh Annual March Madness Show
Every year at this time, as you may have heard, there’s a big-old basketball tournament that goes on. And every year at this time, people in offices and in firehouses and in Rotary Clubs and in Atlantic City enter bracket pools, where they try to win a big-old pile of ducats by predicting just exactly how said big-old basketball tournament will go…

The Nose Saved an Owl; Now It Can Go Kill a Baby
In the remarkable third episode of Louis C.K.’s from-out-of-nowhere filmed theater web series thing Horace and Pete, the two characters (and there are very nearly only two) played by Laurie Metcalf and C.K. are working out the nature of trespass, as it appears in the Lord’s Prayer. As adulterers, they are each trespassers. (But then, we are all trespassers.) And they are both aware that, in trespassing in order to seek pleasure, they create their own hells…

Juliet and Shakespeare’s Women
Hartford Stage’s current production is maybe Shakespeare’s most popular play. This hour, Artistic Director Darko Tresnjak joins us to talk about his neorealist version of Romeo & Juliet. We also talk with Tina Packer, author of Women of Will, about Juliet, a character she calls a touchstone, a turning point in Shakespeare’s œuvre…

We Just Watch for the Commercials
You may have heard there was some big football game on Sunday. You may have heard that the Denver Broncos won, 24 to 10. You may have heard that Beyoncé upstaged Coldplay’s halftime show or that Lady Gaga’s national anthem was “fabulous.” But our guess is you’ve also probably now heard of something called a, um, puppymonkeybaby…

The Audacity of Hoop
While basketball didn’t take up residence in the White House in January 2009, the game nonetheless played an outsized role in forming the man who did, according to Sports Illustrated’s Alexander Wolff, author of The Audacity of Hoop: Basketball and the Age of Obama

The Unreliability of the Unreliable Narrator
At this year’s Golden Globes, the top TV honor, Best Television Series — Drama, went to USA’s hacker technothriller series Mr. Robot. Last year, the trophy went to Showtime’s The Affair. Between those two new shows, there are three point-of-view characters, three narrators. And you can’t really trust, you can’t fully believe a one of them…

The Problem of Evil
For most shows, I’d use these first paragraphs to explain why we’ve chosen to spend an hour on its particular topic. I’d remind you of events in the news. I’d site a publication date. I’d point out a trend that we’ve maybe noticed that you maybe haven’t…

A Love Letter (and Tomatoes) to the Usual Gang of Idiots
Before Stephen Colbert and John Oliver, before Jon Stewart and Conan O’Brien, before The Simpsons, before David Letterman, before Saturday Night Live, before the National Lampoon… before all the great subversive American satirists that we’ve all grown… used to — before all that, there was MAD magazine…

The Scramble Is Fundamentally Indistinguishable from All Other Scrambles
Here’s a question: If the things we’re made of — the particles, the fundamental elemental irreducible bits, the most basic littlest chunks of us — if those things are literally, actually indistinguishable from one another, from the tiniest simplest bits of everyone else, from the tiniest simplest bits of everything else… then what makes us us?

An Up-Close Look Behind the Glass of… Dioramas
When I hear the word “diorama,” the first thing I think of is Mr. Mack’s fifth grade class and painting hills and grass and clouds and a fence into a shoebox and making little cardboard cut outs of Lassie and the boy she loved. God, I hated that stuff…

A New Look Through Rear Window at Hartford Stage
In 1954, Alfred Hitchcock directed two movies. They both star Grace Kelly. They’re both murder mysteries involving a married couple and a boyfriend and a girlfriend. They both take place almost entirely in one room. They both look like plays…

The Nose Has Its Moment of Zen
So we know that everyone in the world is covering the end of Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show today. We know that you’ve probably already listened to an hour or two of radio about Jon Stewart on this very station today. But the thing is, we’re gonna miss Jon Stewart too…

The Scramble Kisses Its Chickens*
The CDC recently announced that kissing or cuddling your chickens is a health hazard. Because… Well, because people kiss or cuddle their chickens, apparently. Some people probably kiss and cuddle their chickens. But you shouldn’t kiss or cuddle your chickens. Because your chickens are basically just waddling featherballs of salmonella, it turns out. So, ya know. Don’t kiss or cuddle your chickens. But before we get to that, two other stories…

The Nose Wonders Why Canned Hams Are Funny
David Letterman reinvented television. He's irreplaceable. He was a comedic revolution. According to President Obama, Letterman is “a part of all of us…”

Making a More Perfect Jury
You probably think of yourself as a voter. Maybe, in one way or another, you think of yourself as a public servant. But do you think of yourself as a juror? More than one in seven Americans will be called for jury duty this year. More than one in three of us will actually serve on a jury in our lifetimes. The fact is that almost every one of us is, almost all of the time, a potential juror. We‘re all just one dreaded summons in the mailbox away from deciding matters of life or liberty or property for another person…

Exploring Exploring
Today on Where We Live we go exploring in the world of earthbound exploration. We’ll poke around in the deepest caves, we’ll peek out from the tops of the tallest trees. And we’ll try to stop and look at what we might’ve missed on our mad rush to the edges of the Earth…

The End of Everything

And radio stories.

“The Money” Makes American Premiere at Arts and Ideas Festival
It’s 5pm. You’re at the Quinnipiack Club in New Haven, where you’ve been shut up in the library. A big, red, digital clock sits in the corner, counting down from 90 minutes. You and 14 other people sit around a table. In the middle of the table sits $300. An audience looks on as you and the others try to figure out what to do with this stack of cash before the time runs out…

Rookie Second Baseman Stands Out in Norwich
You notice Pat Mackenzie on the field at Dodd Stadium in Norwich — not in the bottom of the first, as the Connecticut Tigers’ lead-off hitter. And maybe not in the top of the first, as their second baseman. Before the game even starts, during the national anthem, his shaved-bald, hatless head catches your eye. Or maybe his mustache-free goatee does. But you do notice Pat Mackenzie, as the players line up and face the flag…

All-Star Baseball Comes to the Park City
Sunday night, Major League Baseball announced the starting lineups for this year’s All-Star Game, to be held next week in Cincinnati. Well, this week, Bridgeport will host another version of all-star baseball at The Ballpark at Harbor Yard…

The (Impolite) Science of the Human Body
A new exhibit at the Connecticut Science Center in Hartford examines, in its own words, the impolite science of the human body. WNPR’s Jonathan McNicol has the story, and we should say that this piece includes words and sounds that you probably will find impolite. And so your kids are gonna love it…

A Different Pro Baseball Player Hangs Up His Spikes
A home run by Derek Jeter, his first of the year at Yankee Stadium, helped keep New York’s playoff hopes alive last night in Jeter’s final year in the big leagues after two decades. Well, up the coast, in Bridgeport, Conn., another pro ballplayer is also coming to the end of a storied career after 20 years in the game. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, WNPR’s Jonathan McNicol has the story of Luis Lopez…

Bridgeport Bluefish Ballplayer To Retire After 20-Year Career
One of this year’s biggest sports stories is the retirement of shortstop Derek Jeter after two decades with the New York Yankees. In Bridgeport, another pro ballplayer, this one from the minor leagues, is coming to the end of a storied career after twenty years in the game…

Shakespeare Plus The Beatles, Sort Of, at Yale Rep
Yale Repertory Theatre’s current production plays on Shakespeare to tell the story of The Beatles’ triumphant return to England from the U.S. in 1964. Except the band isn’t quite The Beatles, the language isn’t entirely Shakespeare’s, and the songs aren’t by Lennon and McCartney…

Art Exhibit Draws Inspiration from Talking Heads Song
As a first-time curator, Stephen Grant “kind of did it maybe,” in his words, “backwards.” Rather than base his debut show on specific artists and media, Grant started with a concept, a theme…

And radio segments.

What’s in a Title?
The opening credits of your favorite movies and television shows set the mood, tone, and characters for what’s to come, and allow you to relax and get ready for the show. Some fast-forward through the opening credits to avoid distraction from the main performance. Others say title sequences are supposed to be more like a score: felt, but not noticed…

It’s a Left-Handed Show
Lefties have been scorned as evil, and celebrated as superior. But, like so many things in life, being a southpaw is not so easily defined…

I’m “Tryin’ ” To “Take It Easy” But Everyone’s Fighting Over The Eagles
The Eagles’ first album touched a cultural nerve in 1971, with songs like “Peaceful Easy Feeling” and “Witchy Woman,” a prelude to the hits to come. And, the music never stopped. Despite mounting criticism from critics and fans alike, within five years they rolled those hits into one of the biggest selling Greatest Hits albums of all time. But, a strange thing happened. The more they were loved by teens blasting “Take It Easy” from the rolled-down windows of their parent’s car, the more they were hated by those who said they were too slick, too professional, and lacking the rough edges that revealed a chink in their armor.…

“Endurance” Play Links Shackleton Journey to Financial Crisis
It’s a connection that you might not naturally make—a great explorer with an insecure insurance salesman… but it’s the basis for Split Knuckle Theater Company’s play Endurance, at Long Wharf Theater starting tomorrow…